Festivus provides fun, gives back to school

Festivus provides fun, gives back to school

By Brodrick Kudron It’s a little known fact that Festivus is real holiday. Festivus is a nondenominational holiday that’s traditionally celebrated on December 23rd. The origin of the holiday stems from a man’s refusal to buy into the increased commercialism of the December holiday season. Dan O’Keefe, the father of Daniel O’Keefe, a writer on

By Brodrick Kudron

It’s a little known fact that Festivus is real holiday. Festivus is a nondenominational holiday that’s traditionally celebrated on December 23rd. The origin of the holiday stems from a man’s refusal to buy into the increased commercialism of the December holiday season.

Dan O’Keefe, the father of Daniel O’Keefe, a writer on the hit show Seinfeld, discovered the holiday in a book in 1966 that outlines obscure holidays. The father, Dan O’Keefe, first celebrated it in February, 1966, the anniversary of he and his wife’s first date. There was no particular reason for the name other than it just popping into Dan’s head.

The celebration of Festivus became mainstream after Dan’s son Daniel O’Keefe, a writer on Seinfeld, suggested it for the show.

But here at Lincoln High, since 1999 it has been a celebration of our diverse cultural population.

It also shows the positive things LHS has to offer to students and is a chance for the clubs to raise money. Some of the events that have taken place since the beginning of Festivus, are still here such as the teacher dunk tank.

Every year events are added and changed such as the rock wall, and an obstacle course.
This year challenges are even being set up between teachers and students on the obstacle course, the rock wall, and the joust.

What does Festivus mean to the staff? Festivus organizer Richard Jackson said, “As many of the teachers are clubs sponsors, it provides a way for the kids to have access to the their clubs.”

Associate Principal Jesse Carlson says that Festivus provides teachers with time outside of class to find a positive connection with the kids,  “Whether it be that they sponsor a club, sign up to participate in an event, or just walk around,” Carlson said.
A big difference that Jackson noticed this year was the food.

“We don’t have as many cultural foods as we used to, I would like to see it that way again,” he said.

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