New “Hat Policy” aims to reduce conflict

New “Hat Policy” aims to reduce conflict

By Tesha Ballard The Leadership Team here at LHS met over the summer to come up with a new “Hat Policy,” and although it caused some confusion at first, most students have taken it in stride. The new policy states that  students can’t have any hats on or in sight from 7:55 a.m – 3:05

Associate Principal Mark Larson displays a collection of hats that students have voluntarily turned in to him to keep during the day. Students are no longer allowed to even have hats visible in the building or they may be confiscated. Larson keeps the hats for students, who then pick them up at the end of the school day. Photo by Tesha Ballard

By Tesha Ballard

The Leadership Team here at LHS met over the summer to come up with a new “Hat Policy,” and although it caused some confusion at first, most students have taken it in stride.

The new policy states that  students can’t have any hats on or in sight from 7:55 a.m – 3:05 p.m.

The reason for the sudden  change was because there had been students who would have their hats with them, and during school hours they would put them on. Many staff would have to tell the same student to take the hat off repeatedly throughout the day. They were spending more time telling people to take them off, than controlling the hallways. “With this new hat policy it’ll help kids be prepared and successful in life outside of school, with college and in job interviews.” says Associate Principal Mark Larson.

As we know the old hat policy was that students could have hats with them, but wasn’t allowed on top of their heads.

A couple of students ask why change it now? “They should let us come to school with it. Why should they have change it our senior year, when they could’ve changed it awhile ago” asks Kalen Ward a senior at Lincoln High.  In response Larson said, “It really doesn’t depend on when or what year, the Leadership Team can just take a look at the school policies and anything is up for change.”

There are some students who think negatively of this new rule but there are also others that have a different perspective on the new changes. “If people would have listened the first time, we wouldn’t have it now. It’s not hard to take your hat off and keep it off. As for the students who didn’t, they ruined it for themselves,” senior Abigal Young said. When students don’t take off their hats there are some consequences.

The first time having your hat in sight, you will get your hat taken away and get it back at the end of the day.
The second time you get it taken away you may have to talk to an administrative to see the problem.
Lastly you get a call home.

There are ways to avoid all of this. You can choose to bring your hat to school but you’re suggested to keep it in your locker or backpack.
There are some students who actually give  Larson their hats and he keeps it in a cabinet. They’re not in trouble or anything, he just keeps it safe for them, and they can come get it after school without any hassle.

Larson has said that they haven’t had any problems with students and their hats as of the first full weeks of school and hopes that it will continue like this throughout the year.

 

1 comment
Advocate
EDITOR
PROFILE

Posts Carousel

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

1 Comment

  • Justin Holbein
    September 17, 2012, 12:41 pm

    I like the new policy. It has always been a common courtesy to not where hats inside a building or classroom. There is no disrespect shown by having students remove hats. If they feel disrespected because of a hat then they have more issues going on than just this policy.

    REPLY

Latest Posts

Top Authors

Most Commented

Featured Videos