Lincoln High….Back in the Day: These LHS staff members were once LHS students

Lincoln High….Back in the Day: These LHS staff members were once LHS students

By Christie Do Not a lot of people know this, but Lincoln High has a number of faculty members that once graduated from Lin­coln High, itself. Each issue, The Advo­cate will share a different staff member’s experiences. You’d be amazed at how different Lincoln High was three decades ago. This month, we interviewed Special Educa­tion

Above: Special Education Teacher and LHS alum Linda Johnson-Flowerday holds up the Lincoln High yearbook from 1975 – her senior year. Photo by Christie Do

By Christie Do

Not a lot of people know this, but Lincoln High has a number of faculty members that once graduated from Lin­coln High, itself. Each issue, The Advo­cate will share a different staff member’s experiences.

You’d be amazed at how different Lincoln High was three decades ago. This month, we interviewed Special Educa­tion teacher Linda Johnson-Flowerday who graduated in 1975, about her time at Lincoln High.

“What were some differences in the dress code?”

“The dress code was a little differ­ent. I know for me, on Fridays was when we would wear jeans, and we called it ‘scuzzing out.’ It was a deliberate choice, and I think now, students wear things that when I was in high school, we would’ve never dreamed of. We would wear nice slacks, and be a little more dressed up.”

“Were you in any clubs, and how were they different?”

“Well, I was a cheerleader, and that’s about the same. We had a club called Coed Councilors, which was upperclass­man working with the new 10th graders coming to try to make them feel at home. Back then, we would host teas, which I can’t imagine anyone doing now. We would also hold punch parties and served punch and cookies. I was also in Aqua­links, which was a really big club that was selective back then, and had 3-day tryouts. It was also a class that was all year long. Also, Pep Club was a huge thing. If a girl wasn’t a cheerleader, they were in Pep Club, and they would cheer at every game.”

“Are there any differences in gen­eral that you’ve noticed?”

“Back then, the student lounge was where the library is now, and it was a great place. We had a huge snack bar with booths in there that had a lady who sold popcorn and root beer. And then there was a student lounge that was in the basement that also was a great place to hang out.”

Instead of students walking around aimlessly texting and listening to iPods, Pitch, a very popular card game at the time, was a huge deal. Johnson-Flower­day said that kids would sit everywhere playing the game; in hallways, during lunch, and after school. It was the way they hung out.

“There was no Facebook or any of that, so we weren’t as connected. If you wanted to talk to somebody, you had to call them at home on the landline and hope they were home and hope there wasn’t a busy signal, because even then, message machines didn’t exist to leave a mes­sage. We wouldn’t have dreamed of owning our own phone. There were payphones on every cor­ner, and you would have to drive up and pull out a dime to make a call.”

Lunch was a different story, too. There was no open campus for the first couple of years. There were no nearby fast food places, unlike today, where McDonald’s is right across the street. The clos­est McDonald’s was at 55th and O Street. The closest fast food restaurant was “Chubbyville,” which was on 27th and Vine, and is now a church. There was also no south building yet, because it was the district office. Room 300 was the library with a typical librarian that expected silence 24/7.

Football games were also different. The student section was huge because ev­erybody went to games back then. There were two boys that would fire up the crowd, called Yelkings. After every foot­ball game, students would go to “Kings” restaurant, and they would drive up and down O Street for entertainment.

There were some things that stayed the same, though. Homecoming, Prom, and Joy Nite are still the same traditions, and “Another Lincoln High job well done” was recited too…just not by Mr. Heinemann. It’s incredible to be able to see what Lincoln High was like 30 years ago. Stay tuned for the next installment of “Lincoln High…Back In the Day”!

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