“No My President’s Day” Anti-Trump Rallies

“No My President’s Day” Anti-Trump Rallies
A "Not My President's Day" anti-Trump rally Saul Loeb

In the wake of President’s Day, there have been protests across the country in opposition of President Donald Trump. In New York, protesters held signs with the word “No!” on them in different languages. Merchants sold t-shirts reading “Not My President” above smaller text reading “Elected But Not Chosen.” In Los Angeles, protesters gathered and

In the wake of President’s Day, there have been protests across the country in opposition of President Donald Trump. In New York, protesters held signs with the word “No!” on them in different languages. Merchants sold t-shirts reading “Not My President” above smaller text reading “Elected But Not Chosen.” In Los Angeles, protesters gathered and held signs at City Hall, chanting, “No ban! No wall!” And in Atlanta, the protesters included college students. The protests were intended to show Trump that there is widespread opposition to his policies and “ridiculous” executive orders, including his policies on immigration, climate change, and education. They seem to be effective, because many politicians are now openly opposing or questioning Trump’s policies.

All of this comes at a time of great division in the country about the direction of America.
One of President Trump’s most controversial set of policies are his policies regarding immigration. Proponents of Trump’s policies claim that his immigration views will protect the country from terrorist threats and violence. Another controversial Trump policy involves his views on education and school choice. Trump advocates claim that his vision of charter schools and vouchers will create more school choice and give families an alternative to failing public schools.

Opponents of Trump’s views claim that his immigration policies are discriminatory, hurtful and reckless to refugees who are fleeing persecution and violence in other countries. They claim that these policies are hypocritical, because America has always been a place of opportunity for everyone. Throughout history Immigrants have come to America for better opportunities and better lives. In fact, we have several immigrant students here at East who have left their homelands, come here to Lincoln, and make East a better and more diverse place.

Opponents also believe that President Trump’s education policies will discriminate against students who have disabilities and students who do not have high academic achievement. Charter Schools and Vouchers have entrance tests and other admittance requirements that would prevent certain students from attending. Ultimately, opponents of Trump’s policies feel very strongly that they will lead America down a dark path.

Despite all of this division, there are things that we can hopefully unite about. A united America is stronger, and finding commonalities helps us realize that we have more in common than we do differences. East junior Valerie Griess shared with me the topics that she thinks all Americans can agree on. “Eliminating obesity and other health problems, and uniting instead of fighting against each other are things that all Americans can agree on,” she told me. East teacher Jeremy Fischer also shared with me a topic that he thinks all Americans can agree on.”The importance of the first amendment is something that all Americans can agree on”.

In the end there is great passion on both sides of the issues. Although we are very different, we are also very similar. We all want America to become a better place, and we can make America a better place by uniting. Regardless of who we are, where we come from, what our skin colors are, or anything else, we should be united. We are stronger together than we are apart.

Hope Weber
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